Monology

Because I won't stop talking ... at least, not until I do.

864 notes &

dynamicafrica:

NOT JUST A LABEL invited Moroccan/Israeli designer Artsi Ifrach (creative mind of Art/c) to Addis Ababa for Ethiopian Fashion Week for fashion show celebrating twenty years of African trade.

Above is a visual representation of Ifrach‘s trip to Ethiopia photographed by Moroccan photographer Laila Hida.

The styling of the photographs capture — a wondrous city of eclectic beauty, rich culture and a burgeoning fashion industry. Ifrach gets resourceful by mixing fabrics, prints with embroideries, kaftan buttons, shimmering colors and embellishments.

via AFROKLECTIC

September: Highlighting African photographers.

(via poc-creators)

1,336 notes &

thekhooll:

Cape Romano Dome House

"Built in 1981 on the southern tip of Marco Island, the Dome House is an igloo-like concrete complex made up of white dome chambers, now decaying and slipping slowly into the ocean. Many know about it’s whereabouts but it’s origins were up to debate; from alien to secret cults. In truth, it was built by a retired oil producer and inventor… The structures remain there to this day but are so far from the shore due to changing shoreline, that any attempt at saving them has probably long been lost.” [via]

Images via.

(Source: archatlas)

318 notes &

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar: An elderly Bezanozano man, c 1841.
The Bezanozano are believed to be one of the earliest Malagasy ethnic groups to establish themselves in Madagascar, where they inhabit an inland area between the Betsimisaraka lowlands and the Merina highlands.
Their name means “those of many small plaits” in reference to their traditional hairstyle, and like the Merina they practice famadihana (the reburial ceremony).
The Bezanozano speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo.
Name, date and photographer unknown. Text edited from Wiki.

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar: An elderly Bezanozano man, c 1841.

The Bezanozano are believed to be one of the earliest Malagasy ethnic groups to establish themselves in Madagascar, where they inhabit an inland area between the Betsimisaraka lowlands and the Merina highlands.

Their name means “those of many small plaits” in reference to their traditional hairstyle, and like the Merina they practice famadihana (the reburial ceremony).

The Bezanozano speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo.

Name, date and photographer unknown. Text edited from Wiki.

(via dynamicafrica)